Planes Can Fly Without Their Engines, Here’s How

Date: 2020-01-26 17:00:07

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Here’s a pop quiz! Name three differences between an airplane and your car. If one of your answers was “I don’t fall ten thousand feet when I run out of gas,” you and I clearly think alike. But really, planes are pretty good at staying up in the air when an engine goes down.

That might seem strange at first; you wouldn’t turn off your car while driving, after all, but there are a lot of reasons pilots might need to shut the engines down while still in the air. One of the most common causes is that something got into the engine’s air intake.

Other videos you might like:
What Happens When a Bird Flies Into a Plane Engine

A Plane Lost Its Roof at 24,000 Feet But Managed to Land

Birds Ruined the Engines But the Plane Couldn’t Come Back

TIMESTAMPS:
Why do pilots sometimes have to shut the engine down? 0:21
What are the most common hazards for an engine? 1:18
A-10 Warthog aircraft design flaw 1:55
What else can cause a flameout? 2:21
Is an emergency landing always wild? 2:52
Is it hard to land a plane on one engine? 3:28
What happens if all the engines were to go out at once? 3:52
How likely is it to happen? 6:06
“Miracle on the Hudson” 6:33
What would happen if a helicopter lost its engines in flight? 7:21

#planes #aviation #brightside

SUMMARY:
-There are a lot of reasons pilots might need to shut the engines down while still in the air. One of the most common causes is that something got into the engine’s air intake.
-In an airplane, birds, hail stones and ash from volcanic eruptions and large forest fires are among the most significant hazard when it comes to plugging up the intake.
-Due do a design oversight, the US Air Force’s A-10 Warthog aircraft’s large, fuselage mounted engines had the habit of ingesting the smoke produced by its own firepower. This would result in a flameout and a very unhappy pilot.
-Flameouts can also be caused by an equipment failure on the plane itself, typically in the fuel pump or other engine components.
-The Federal Aviation Administration requires commercial planes to be able to fly and land safely with only one engine operational.
-It’s so easy to land a plane on one engine that many autopilot systems can manage it without assistance from the humans in the cockpit.
-This kind of total failure is extremely unlikely, but there have been isolated incidents of that very thing happening to aircraft in flight. For example, Air Canada Flight 143 suffered a double engine flameout in 1983.
-A lot of different things need to go wrong before a complete engine failure, so it’s really unlikely.
-“Miracle on the Hudson” in January 2009 occurred after an Airbus A320 collided with a flock of geese shortly after taking off from New York City’s LaGuardia Airport. The accident resulted in the loss of both engines and forced the pilot, Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, to make a risky water landing in the nearby Hudson river.
-Helicopters have an even easier time landing without power than planes do. A helicopter’s rotors act like a combination propeller and wing, providing both lift and forward momentum.

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